10 Must-Read LGBT Books

    Thought-provoking stories by renowned LGBT authors.

    These eye-opening LGBT books, both fiction and nonfiction, brush on topics relevant to all walks of life: identity, morality, social justice, and self-acceptance. Prepare to come face to face with how far our society has come—and how far we have yet to go.


    Family Life and Relationships

    Consenting Adult

    By Laura Z. Hobson

    Same-sex marriage is legal in 37 states in 2015, but in the closeted climate of the 1960s, Hobson’s tale of a mother struggling to understand and accept her son’s homosexuality pushed the conversation forward.

    Consenting Adult

    By Laura Z. Hobson

    The Lord Won't Mind

    Entering college in the late 1930s, Charlie just has to find a nice girl, get married, and have a few kids. Instead, he meets Peter Martin, who is everything that Charlie has ever wanted, and Charlie is forced to choose between two options: complying with the expectations of society and family, or following the call of true love. A timeless read, this classic gay love story spent 16 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list after it was first published.

    The Charioteer

    Set in World War II England, the love triangle connects a wounded soldier torn between his love for a younger conscientious objector and an older, experienced schoolmate. This novel has been called one of the foundation stones of gay literary fiction, ranking alongside James Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room and Gore Vidal’s The City and the Pillar. 

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    Bullying and Hate Crimes

    The Drowning of Stephan Jones

    By Bette Greene

    We wish stories of homophobia had no basis in truth, but this senseless act of violence was based on real events. Though it’s been decades since the book was written, this profoundly moving story continues to force readers to confront the ill effects of bullying, hate crimes, and groupthink.

    The Drowning of Stephan Jones

    By Bette Greene

    Shine

    By Lauren Myracle

    Sixteen-year-old Cat’s best friend is victimized by a hate crime, and she wants to find out who committed it. This is a haunting mystery that turns a small Southern town on its head and illustrates the difficulty of defying your community to pursue what’s right.

    Shine

    By Lauren Myracle

    Memoirs and Personal Discovery

    Becoming a Man

    By Paul Monette

    At the core of this memoir is a classic coming-of-age story. Monette grew up all-American, Catholic, smart, successful—and afraid to be who he truly was. It was the 1950s and being a homosexual was not in the least bit acceptable. Monette kept his secret throughout his adolescence for fear of ridicule and rejection. His journey to adulthood and to self-acceptance is filled with grace and honesty. It’s an intimate portrait of a young man’s struggle with his own desires that is witty, humorous, and deeply moving.

    Becoming a Man

    By Paul Monette

    A Boy's Own Story

    By Edmund White

    Critically lauded upon its initial publication in 1982 for its pioneering depiction of homosexuality, A Boy’s Own Story is a moving tale about coming-of-age in midcentury America. With searing clarity and unabashed wit, Edmund White’s unnamed protagonist yearns for what he knows to be shameful. Looking back on his experiences, the narrator notes, “I see now that what I wanted was to be loved by men and to love them back but not to be a homosexual.” This trailblazing autobiographical story of one boy’s youth is a moving, tender, and heartbreaking portrait of what it means to grow up.

    A Boy's Own Story

    By Edmund White

    Women's Perspectives

    Desert of the Heart

    By Jane Rule

    Rule’s first novel — now a classic of gay and lesbian literature — established her as a foremost writer of the vagaries and yearnings of the female heart. This is a novel that dares to ask whether love between two women can last. (It also has one of our favorite opening lines: “Conventions, like clichés, have a way of surviving their own usefulness. They are then excused or defended as the idioms of living.”)

    Desert of the Heart

    By Jane Rule

    Loving Her

    By Ann Allen Shockley

    This is a groundbreaking novel of two very different women, one black and one white, and a love threatened by prejudice, rage, and violence. A struggling African American musician, Renay is married to a violent, abusive alcoholic. While performing at an upscale supper club, she meets Terry Bluvard. Beautiful, wealthy, and white, Terry awakens feelings that the talented black pianist never realized she possessed—and before long, Renay moves into Terry’s world of luxury and privilege. Yet the storm clouds of her previous life still threaten, and Terry’s love alone may not be enough to protect Renay.

    Loving Her

    By Ann Allen Shockley

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    • LGBT
    • lit


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