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6 Rachel Carson Books That Will Make You See the World With New Eyes

Through writing and research, the legendary conservationist shaped our modern perspective of the environment.

Perhaps more than anyone, Rachel Carson understood the importance of appreciating and protecting the natural world. A writer, marine biologist, and legendary environmentalist, she had a knack for bridging unfamiliar science with poetic, sensory language. With the publication of her books, readers of all ages, locations, and educational backgrounds suddenly had access to nature's hidden wonders. It incited a revolution: Carson's research on pesticides resonated so strongly, and so widely, that people began to question if humans truly should conquer nature (hint: we shouldn't).

In today’s world, it’s easy to forget to stop and smell the roses—but if there’s anything Carson taught us, it’s that it's important to do so. From captivating meditations on the sea to game-changing insights on our environmental footprint, the following Rachel Carson books remind us to take a breath, open our eyes, and witness the miracles around us.

1941

Buy Under the Sea Wind at Amazon

Under the Sea Wind

By Rachel Carson

The habits of sea creatures aren’t easily accessible to anyone far from the coastline, or unfamiliar with marine biology—but Carson sought to fix that in her debut. With poetic and creative flair, Carson approaches her subjects as if they're storybook heroes, naming a particular mackerel or eel before tracking its life journey. The effect is a chronicle of East Coast animal life that is informative but never tedious or bogged down by scientific jargon. Instead, Under the Sea Wind has all the trappings of an escapist novel: vivid description, fascinating characters, and magical settings you'll dream of visiting.

Though it released with little fanfare in 1941, the book is now considered one of the most important works of nature writing.

Under the Sea Wind

By Rachel Carson

1951

Buy The Sea Around Us at Amazon

The Sea Around Us

By Rachel Carson

Carson broke onto the scene with The Sea Around Us, which won the 1951 National Book Award and earned a long-term position on the New York Times bestseller list. Like its predecessor, Under the Sea Wind, it disseminates the complex magic of the ocean for the everyday reader—including the wonders that lie in, or rise from, its darkest depths. It was adapted into an Oscar-winning documentary of the same name, though Carson wasn't exactly happy with the finished product.

The Sea Around Us

By Rachel Carson

1955

Buy The Edge of the Sea at Amazon

The Edge of the Sea

By Rachel Carson

The final installment in her sea trilogy, The Edge of the Sea is another showcase of Carson's ability to translate nature's strangest rhythms into concise, poetic writing. It studies the ecosystems of the Atlantic coastline, revealing the secrets of tide pools, incandescent “moon jellies,” and other underwater phenomena. After the book's publication in 1955, Carson began focusing more on conservation work—a transition that would lead to drastic changes in our views of the environment. Read an excerpt over at our sister site The Portalist. 

The Edge of the Sea

By Rachel Carson

1962

Buy Silent Spring at Amazon

Silent Spring

By Rachel Carson

Those changes came with Silent Spring, Carson’s most famous book and the inspiration behind the environmental movement. When the government launched the “gypsy moth” program in 1957—an initiative that supported the widespread use of pesticides—Carson set out to stop it. She did so with careful research: Over the course of several years, Carson observed the effects of synthetic chemicals on natural ecosystems, and discovered how far-reaching and how adverse those effects truly are. While her conclusions—all relayed in Silent Spring—were received with great criticism, they also prompted the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency in 1970.

Silent Spring

By Rachel Carson

1965

Buy The Sense of Wonder at Amazon

The Sense of Wonder

By Rachel Carson

Carson and her grandnephew, Roger, spent much of their time outdoors, walking through the woods of Maine and enthusiastically watching the wildlife. The Sense of Wonder is the result of these adventures and is, in a way, Carson’s recreation of them: With it, she hoped to instill a similar sense of awe in any child curious about birdsong, the movements of the wind, or the light of the stars.

The Sense of Wonder

By Rachel Carson

1998

Buy Lost Woods at Amazon

Lost Woods

By Rachel Carson

Lost Woods is a collection of Carson’s little-known or unpublished writings, but it rings with the passion, poeticism, and wisdom of her most popular books. Each entry was curated by her biographer, Linda Lear, and spans decades of Carson's life—including journal entries from her schoolgirl days to her later speeches on environmental protection. It’s a fascinating look at how Carson evolved into the trailblazer she was and offers a “frequent sense of being in [her] company” (Publishers Weekly).

Lost Woods

By Rachel Carson

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Featured photo courtesy of Alchetron 

Published on 20 Apr 2018

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